Archived entries for Football

Movers and Shakers

As last week’s Champions League game between Real Madrid and Manchester City opened up in the last quarter, ITV commentator Clive Tyldesley exclaimed “What’s he doing there?” as substitute full-back Paulo Zabaleta found himself in the six-yard box; Tyldesley’s been doing football at the highest level for decades now, with a spell at BBC television in between his second spell at ITV, but it seems he still hasn’t come to terms with the concept of passing and movement. Continue reading…

Power in a Union

Last night Newcastle fought back to get a 2-2 draw with Everton in an entertaining game that had a brilliant opening goal from Leighton Baines after a free-flowing move, two clinical equalizers from the substitute Demba Ba and the farcical minute when the home side weren’t given a goal despite the ball being over the line before the referee stopped play instead of playing advantage as Newcastle looked to be through on goal when breaking.

As the host of Monday Night Football, Ed Chamberlin, said, it was the game of the weekend. But the main reason it will rightly be remembered was for the tribute to the victims of Hillsborough. Continue reading…

Shake Your Money

For most of Europe the annoying leak that was the summer transfer window finally stopped its constant dripping in the early hours of Saturday morning, after a final day frenzy when Sky Sports News presenters talked up a “Totalizer” as if clubs were contributing to a charity telethon target rather than often spending their way to the road to ruin where Portsmouth, Leeds United and Glasgow Rangers have already taken the first steps in previous seasons. Continue reading…

The Return

The new football season has entered quietly through the back door just seven weeks after the Final of European Championship, a tournament consuming at the time but now a distant memory in the shadow of an Olympics that brought a festival of sport to London as enjoyable as any in modern times. Every four years the Summer Olympics inspires in some-way, but sport of the highest quality played to capacity crowds in great venues with a captivated public took this summer’s Games to another level.

Following the success of Team GB is an unenviable task for the home nations’ national sides, and earlier in the week International teams played their annual August friendly games with the usual weaker squads, which as always provided little excitement. England’s pattern of play looked better in Berne in Italy than at any time so far under Roy Hodgson, with Michael Carrick, incredulously ignored in the summer, at the heart of a five-man midfield who actually looked comfortable in possession at times. Despite Hodgson’s semantics about both Carrick and tactics in his press conferences, maybe he has learnt from his mistakes.

In the first weekend of the English Premier League there was a quick glimpse of the entertainment sport as a spectacle brings as newly promoted Southampton briefly came from behind to take the lead at the Manchester City, cheering watching neutrals across the country tired of hearing City’s manager Roberto Mancini bemoaning the depth of his richly assembled squad after every game. Continue reading…

Olympics: Schools Legacy

Martin Cloake points out the knee-jerk policies and soundbites coming from the London Mayor and Tory Ministers following the success of the London 2012 Olympics highlight a Government back-tracking on funding decisions while perpetuating myths on competition that undermine technique and do little to encourage initial participation and activity.

Apparently, we’re all sports fans now

The Olympics have caught the public’s imagination so much that promoting school sport and getting kids involved in sport has suddenly become a hot issue. This is a good thing, but let’s get rid of some some of the bluster and codswallop. Setting something up on poor foundations is almost as bad as not setting it up at all.

A week ago I worried that by making the point that there needed to be a reversal of the cuts in facilities and time devoted to sport would be condemned as ‘playing politics’. Playing politics is a term used by politicians to dismiss something they don’t want to acknowledge. But now, this Government is falling over itself to make political capital out of the success of Team GB, and to rewrite history in the process. Continue reading…

GB Football: Quarter-Final

Tom Bodell, who has been looking at the GB Football’s men’s team since their reformation, reports on their Quarter-Final exit in an otherwise great day for Team GB at the London 2012 Olympics today.

Whilst Team GB have eased into the men’s football tournament, gradually improving game-by-game, tonight’s quarter final clash with South Korea certainly bucked the trend as Team GB reverted to type and put in a stuttering display through 120 minutes before crashing out 5-4 on penalties. Continue reading…

GB Football: Qualification

Tom Bodell continues to chart the progress of the reformed Men’s Great British Football Team, as a victory over Uruguay ensures qualification from the Group Stages at London 2012.

The legendary England manager Sir Alf Ramsey once labelled the Uruguay national side as ‘animals’, on tonight’s showing the World Cup winner’s sentiments are still prevalent 46 years later.

In an encounter between what should have been the two best teams in Group A of the men’s Olympic football, the antics of the South Americans spoiled a game which, on paper, was rightly billed as a crucial clash in the group. In actuality it was a fairly tepid affair, lit up only by the tempestuous nature of Luis Suarez and his band of chums. Continue reading…

Olympics: Being There – Men’s Football

Senegal v Uruguay and GB v UAE at Wembley, Sunday 29 July 2012

Despite the minor mishaps, London 2012 has started well. There were none of the major problems in delivery past Host Cities have faced, with the issue of calling in the public services to bail out G4S typical of wider issues than those related to the Games. For over a week before the official opening the anticipation has been noticeable on commuter trains in and out of London, a dominant form of conversation between strangers who usually would otherwise be looking down at their phones. Likewise the Torch Relay’s journey through all 33 London Boroughs brought people and communities together both in deprived areas as well as at parties and in one-off events.

On a train out of London the night of the Opening Ceremony children from North Wales were excitedly talking about how they had met Athletes where they were “Guards of Honour”, an early example of Legacy and a reminder how sport can instantly inspire. It was a Ceremony that instilled pride in Britain and a great start to the Games, with the large TV audience answering cynics who cited apathy towards the cultural festival that the United Kingdom is lucky enough to have for two weeks.

On the first full day of action BBC’s new 24 channels quickly became sporting fan’s delight, a selection box with numerous sports attracting attention. In fact after Day 1 the only big disappointment were the empty seats at venues where demand was high and millions of applicants had previously been unsuccessful. There were few empty seats in Wembley Stadium by the time the Great Britain’s men football team kicked-off the second game of a double bill last night, with most of the vacant places caused by those still queuing for food and drink as the only debit card accepted for payment was no longer accepted for payment, as basic technology failed. Continue reading…

GB Football Team: Wembley Win

Continuing his pieces on the men’s GB Football Team reformed for the London 2012 Olympics, Tom Bodell reports on tonight’s win against the UAE at Wembley Stadium.

Team GB upped their performance in a 3-1 victory over an impressive United Arab Emirates side tonight, that for a frustrating second-half period looked like they would become the second side to take points from Stuart Pearce’s side in the London 2012 Olympic football.

With three changes from the side which stuttered to a draw in their opening group game against Senegal, Team GB were much more fluid from the off with round pegs put to use in round holes. Continue reading…

GB Football Team: Stuttering Start

Tom Bodell continues his pieces for The Substantive on the newly formed men’s British football team competing under the banner of ‘Team GB’ in London 2012, reflecting on their opening draw with Senegal at Old Trafford.

For the second time in six days it was hardly classic stuff from Stuart Pearce’s Team GB, who, by full-time, could quite easily have been grateful to take a point from their opening match of London 2012. Continue reading…



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