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Bruce Springsteen Wembley 2016

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, Wembley Stadium, 5 June 2016
Springsteen Wembley June 2016

Photograph ©TheSubstantive

Through the wonders of the world wide web, there is now a nice little fan created site that allows other Springsteen followers to have a look at some of the stats of the variety of sets The Boss has played dating back to 1973. In that time word has spread that he, augmented with the E Street Band, are the best live rock’n’roll performers in history. And the word is right.

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band’s only London performance during The River Tour 2016 produces all the magic of a Springsteen gig, acting like a drug that takes hours to come down from, leaves a glow for days to come and leaves people walking away thinking it was an even better hit than the last. And the last, two nights earlier at Coventry, was brilliant. Like at Coventry he played 33 songs, but yet 14 of them were different from the Friday night.

At sixty-six years of age there is a recognition that Bruce can’t go on forever, while he still continues makes every live performance special. Throughout a hot and humid day in north-west London anticipation builds as people flock from their local accomedation from their overseas trips, the rail replacement services, the slow Sunday trains and the 182 bus that stops at Wembley Park. And that anticipation explodes into an atmosphere that lasts an unrelenting three and a half hour perfomance. Continue reading…

Bruce Springsteen Coventry 2016

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, Ricoh Arena, 3 June 2016

Bruce Springsteen Coventry 2016 For You Live Solo

Photograph ©TheSubstantive

It is not even quarter to seven in the evening when Bruce Springsteen walks on stage in Coventry. He’s on his own and saunters over to sit at Roy Bittan’s grey piano, lit sky blue by the lights. Something special, in the spirit of Hyde Park 2012, is coming. He delivers a rare outing of For You, from his debut album released in January 1973; on record it is a song where he is at his most Dylan-like, with cutting, poetic lyrics and flowing delivery where he throws away the odd line with disdain as part of a fuller, fluent sound. The live solo verison is more sombre and a sold out stadium, which was bustling before the start to the point there was no room to move in the first third of the matted football pitch. fell silent in awe.

Almost seamlessly he brings on the band, walks centre stage and within a heartbeat they launch into a thrilling version of Something in the Night. Something in the eye. But there ain’t even a cloud in the sky. Soon, many were lost in a flood. Something in the Night, a song about blanking everything else all out in lament, was delivered with an intensity that was transparent both in the sound and in The Boss’s face, beamed close-up on big screens. It was then followed immediately by Prove it All Night. Two storming versions of songs he cited at Wembley 2013 as part of his fiercest collection. Overpowering yet empowering at the same time. To nick another Springsteen lyric, he is getting a crowd to laugh and cry in a single sound. And it wasn’t even 7pm. Continue reading…



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