Archived entries for

Postcapitalism

postcapitalism-book-cover

At significant moments for the economy in the last ten years, from the global banking crisis in 2008 to the recent near shutdown of Greece, anyone in Britain interested in current affairs would be sure to catch a Paul Mason TV report like Tarantino used to run to the cinema for a new Scorsese release in the seventies. Like those news despatches, Mason’s new book, Postcapitalism, is informative, enlightening and engaging.

As it says on the tin (in this case a lovely black hardback), the book looks to the future in a fast changing world, but not before exploring the past and explaining the present. As well as sharing his experiences in the field, Mason mixes micro and macro economics, an in-depth political and economic knowledge and hard evidence to make a convincing case why the current economic model is not only reaching the end of its life-cycle, but how the information technology network can be the basis that both connects globally while individually giving us autonomy in a sustainable society. Continue reading…

Football Column – Concrete Jungle

Spurs at Bayern Munich

In the latest drip-drip of stories from Sky Sports News in the first week of the English Premier League season they announced this evening that Sunderland have opened a Fan Zone; in other words they have made use of a vast car park to put up a few large umbrellas and a big screen in which they can flog bland lager in plastic containers. Half way through a week that started with a live 12.45pm game decided by a lone own goal and will end with football on Friday evening due to drained police resources being diverted to a march by wannabe fascists the following day, EPL Week 1 is dragging like a shoot out midway through Season 2 of True Detective: overblown, unrealistic, fragments of flying glass flying at bleeding coppers and a bit boring. Continue reading…



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